Welcome to King of the gadgets!

Home tools Buyer's Guides from tech enthusiast who loves technology and clever solutions for better living.

Check Today Price

Best trackball for gaming 2018 – [Buyer’s Guide]

Last Updated December 1, 2018
Share on Facebook0Share on Google+0Pin on Pinterest0Share on StumbleUpon0Tweet about this on Twitter

Arnold SimmonsHi there, my name is Arnold Simmons and the first thing I would like to say is thanks for stopping by my website. After spending over 27 hours comparing at least 17 trackball for gaming, I am recommending the best trackball for gaming of 2018

Just read here for my top 3 recommendations. Why are these 3 trackball for gaming on top of my list? Well read on… In this section we provide our readers with a comparison table of our top picks. Scroll past the table for a closer look at each of the 3 best trackball for gaming in our review section.

Best trackball for gaming of 2018

Based on customer reviews and my own experience with the cowboy method I’ve found the best 3 trackball for gaming on the market. If you’re scouring the market for the best trackball for gaming, you’d better have the right info before spending your money.

The rating is based on multiple factors: The 3 metrics ‐ Design, Materials, Performance, and other indicators such as: Popularity, Opinions, Brand, Reputation and more. Simply review and buy them.

Test Results and Ratings

Rank №1 №2 №3
Product
Total 4.8 4.5 4.3
Style
5 points
4 points
4 points
Versatility
4 points
4 points
5 points
Durability
5 points
5 points
4 points
Quality
5 points
5 points
4 points
Awards 1
button button button
banner banner banner

 

 

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the trackball for gaming by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

№1 – Logitech Wireless Trackball M570

 
Logitech Wireless Trackball M570

Pros
Trackball comfort: Sculpted shape supports your hand and stays in one place—move the cursor without moving your arm
Work and play anywhere: Get smooth, precise cursor control wherever you use your trackball—your desk, couch, even your bed
Logitech Unifying receiver: Connect up to six Unifying compatible devices with one tiny wireless receiver that stays in your laptop
Cons
Not found yet.
 
Total:
4.8

Why did this trackball for gaming win the first place?

I don’t know anything about other models from this brand, but I am fully satisfied with this product. I am very happy with the purchase. It is definitely worth its money. The product is top-notch! The material is stylish, but it smells for the first couple of days. I really enjoy the design. It is compact, comfortable and reliable. And it looks amazing!

banner2


Style
5

5star

Versatility
4

4star

Durability
5

5star

Quality
5

5star

 

 

№2 – ELECOM M-HT1DRBK Wireless Trackball Mouse – Extra Large Ergonomic Design

 
ELECOM M-HT1DRBK Wireless Trackball Mouse - Extra Large Ergonomic Design

Pros
Cutting-Edge Responsiveness – Each advanced computer trackball mouse features a highly-accurate optical sensor to give you fast, precise tracking and movement
Larger Design, Ergonomic Comfort – This new wireless trackball mouse is bigger than its predecessor to give users a bigger palm rest and grip comfort stability
Cons
Limited official sellers leave room for fakes.
A little more expensive than other brands on the market.
 
Total:
4.5

Why did this trackball for gaming come in second place?

I like this product. For such a low price, I didn’t even hope it to be any better. It’s decently made. Seems that the material is good. It has a very beautiful color but I don’t really like the texture. The design quality is top notch and the color is nice. I really liked it. It is amazing in every aspect. It did even exceed my expectations for a bit, considering the affordable price.

banner2


Style
4

4star

Versatility
4

4star

Durability
5

5star

Quality
5

5star

 

 

№3 – Logitech MX ERGO Advanced Wireless Trackball for Windows PC and Mac

 
Logitech MX ERGO Advanced Wireless Trackball for Windows PC and Mac

Pros
Logitech’s most advanced wireless trackball for Windows PC and Mac requires 20% less muscular strain than a regular computer mouse
Unique adjustable hinge allows you to customize the trackball angle from 0 to 20 degrees for a more natural, comfortable hand position
Cons
Quite expensive.
It requires frequent cleaning and washing..
 
Total:
4.3

Why did this trackball for gaming take third place?

The material is incredibly nice to the touch. It has a great color, which will suit any wallpapers. It is inconvenient to use due to the size. I am going to get something different next time. This price is appropriate since the product is very well built. I liked the design. We’ve been using it for 2 months and it still looks like brand new.

banner2


Style
4

4star

Versatility
5

5star

Durability
4

4star

Quality
4

4star

 

 

trackball for gaming Buyer’s Guide

If you keep the before points in mind, you can easily go out to the market and buy trackball for gaming, right? No!

Tilt options are limited

The mouse’s thumb buttons are located to the right of the trackball.

Logitech’s MX Master

In all seriousness, though, stress ailments from computer use are no joking matter at all. It’s axiomatic that if you repeat any physical task endlessly, eventually that body area gets overused and injured. Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and related nerve damage in the hand and wrist, though, are relatively new forms of RMS. Among the fastest-spreading occupational injuries, CTS saw its genesis in the typing pools that surfaced in the first decade of the 20th century. When computers became common for both work and play, CTS and similar injuries expanded by leaps.

Frequent keyboard use was bad enough, but mouse use has aggravated the problem in its own set of ways. Where keyboards caused repetitive strain from a relatively fixed position, mice can trigger this in other, less obvious ways. Strain on the arm is one aspect. Then there’s a host of tendon- and nerve-afflicting issues caused by physical features on the more “advanced” types of mousing devices we so enjoy for work and play. Orthopedic surgeons never had it so good.

The silver lining in this gloom is that the sheer cost of these injuries—in terms of pain, time off, surgery, and recovery costs—has awakened a general public awareness of computing and workplace ergonomics. Standing desks are now an option in the offices of some enlightened employers; provisioning people with comfortable peripherals now falls under the HR department at some companies, not the IT department. And while this relative awakening hasn’t resulted in the average person understanding the differences between their proximal phalanges and their gluteus maximus, it has raised the level of concern high enough to engage the attention of peripherals manufacturers. The result has been many interesting ideas to improve mice ergonomically, from physical design to software features, from subtle changes of shape to complete makeovers.

Make no mistake: Mouse overuse can still cause damage in the long term. But carefully weighing the ergonomic advantages offered by a mouse can lead to an informed purchase—and in turn, to fewer problems accumulating over the years.

Mionix’s Castor

ANGLE TURNING. So far, we’ve only seen and tested this on Mionix mice: the Mionix Castor and the Mionix Avior 7000. However, it’s an intriguingly different (and potentially useful) feature to anyone interested in mouse ergonomics. As Mionix puts it, this literally “tilts the X and Y axes of the mouse up to 30 degrees to the left or right,” which gives you greater flexibility in terms of wrist and arm positioning.

Ergonomics isn’t a wand you can wave that makes injuries better, or prevents injury in the future. But a mouse that’s designed with some ergonomic features in mind can reduce the intensity of injury to the hands and arms of many people, while putting off the onset of these injuries’ symptoms for a longer period of time. There are no guarantees. (How could there be, with so many variables in play?) But it stands to reason that taking better care of your hands is essential to their health. And one important step along the way is using a mouse that fosters this.

The mice below, with the exception of the DXT, aren’t marketed as “ergonomic mice” first and foremost. But these are some of the better selections we’ve seen of late for comfort and/or adaptability. Consider them good jumping-off points for your search, not the be-all and end-all of options.

Buttons and ball size

Although most trackballs are suited for gaming, you might want to consider the amount of buttons on the trackball and the size of the ball. A large ball usually gives more precision and more buttons could give you more options in certain games. Compare trackballs here to see available models and options.

Fit to your hand

Also it could be a good idea to have a look at the trackball in a store first, to see if it would fit the size of your hand. Some trackballs are quite large and some are smaller and more suited for small hands. The Kensington Expert is good for people with large hands, while the Logitech Marble and Kensington Orbit are great for everyone including people with smaller hands and fingers.

This trackball is wireless with a 30ft of range. It uses logitech 2.GHz faster data transmission technology that can transfer data without any delay or dropout. To connect this trackball, you need to connect its wireless receiver to your laptop. With this tiny receiver, you can even connect more wireless devices to it.

ELECOM M-DT2URBK Wired Trackball mouse

This trackball is designed with black ball on top left.It uses gaming sensor for exceptionally smooth tracking experience. Mouse wheel and primary buttons are on the left side of the mouse along with back/forward buttons. Total it has buttons.There is also a slim button on the right side for right click. It is easy to remove the ball and clean it. You must connect it to a pc using usb. Setup is also easy. The manual comes with English and Japanese.

How we score

The Engadget Score is a unique ranking of products based on extensive independent research and analysis by our expert editorial and research teams. The Global Score is arrived at only after curating hundreds, sometimes thousands of weighted data points (such as critic and user reviews).

There are two types of trackball mouse designs, thumb-operated trackball designs like Logitech M570 and finger operated trackballs like Logitech Marble and Kensington SlimBlade. Both design concepts operate in the same way except that you use thumb in one and fingers in other based on your comfort and convenience.

In most designs, thumb operated trackballs consist of a small ball on the left side that makes it usable for only right hand. These designs combine mouse and trackball allowing you to move around like a typical mouse and manipulate the ball at the same time.

The ball size in thumb-operated trackballs is relatively small as in Logitech M570, which means it is not very easy to control but with your fingers available, you can do multitasking like operating buttons and scroll wheels.

Most finger-operated trackball mice have ambidextrous design as they work for both right and left hands. The ball is relatively bigger in size and placed at the center top. In most of these mice like Kensington SlimBlade, users can move the cursor only by moving the ball.

As bigger balls offer more precise control, these are mostly used by professionals.

Other than the two basic types, there is another option, apple touch pad. But the design is for only professionals and designers who work on 3D modeling and other detailed designing.

The size of the mouse and trackball depends on the size of your hand. If you have a small hand, Kensington Orbit Trackball can work better than other options. Similarly, Kensington SlimBlade with a wide base and large ball work perfectly for bigger hands.

Other than the overall size of the mouse, the size of the ball also matters. If you are a professional, you must look for trackballs with large size. The bigger the ball is, the better control you have. This is why professionals prefer Kensington Expert Mouse Trackball and Kensington SlimBlade over other options.

You can find to buttons in most mice. In more advanced models like Kensington Expert Mouse Trackball, you can also have an option to customize their functions as well.

Even though most new models have a scroll wheel, but you can still find designs that don’t. If your main purpose is to browse the internet, mice with scroll wheels offer better functionality.

You can also find scroll wheels at different positions in each design.   A small scroll wheel that can be controlled by the index or middle finger, like in M570. These are mostly thumb-operated trackballs.   A small scroll wheel that can be controlled by the thumb, most common in ambidextrous designs. In some modern mice, the scroll ring surrounds the trackball that can be used with thumb and pinky finger.

Inexpensive

It is the most cost effective option in our list, with almost the same accuracy and features like the other expensive options. It allows tracking with the large ball that is smooth and very easy. It comes with two large web surfing buttons on both sides that allow users to move forward or backward quickly.

The long ambidextrous design provides ample space for palm to rest on the mouse. The large ball at the top-center can be used with the center fingers. It is also a good fit for both large and small hands. You can easily remove the ball with a gentle push for cleaning.

Technology

Logitech is known for its advanced patented optical sensor technology that offers precise cursor control. Irrespective of the surface you are using your mouse on, you can have the same tracking experience.

Unlike the M570, this one is not wireless. You can connect with your laptop or desktop with USB or PS/Port.

Get Rid of Wrist Strain

The top mounted trackball with flat wide (almost equals to a mouse pad) base is a great relief for those who are suffering from wrist strain. The base is also very slim that keeps your hand and arm very low on desk or table, almost parallel to the surface.

Largest ball

The track ball is large (5mm) that makes it very easy to use with fingers. The surface also contains four large buttons that can be pushed by your thumb and pinky finger while the center three fingers can be placed on the ball.

With different sensitivity modes, users can switch sensitivity for standard computer purpose and for more professional work like graphics designing or video editing.

Programmable Buttons

The mouse also contains four large programmable buttons (on each side) that can be programmed according to right hand or left hand use. Normally, the bottom-left button is used for left click but you can customize buttons using TrackballWorks software.

Perfect for Small Hands and Longer Use

The mouse is relatively small than other options listed in our article, making it a perfect option for smaller hands. It is also very light and easy to move around. You can use both right and left hands on this mouse.

The mouse has programmable buttons on both sides that allows users to customize right and left clicks according to right or left-hand use.

The ball is of medium size that is surrounded by a scroll ring to navigate web pages. For cleaning, you can pop it out with a gentle push.

Large Ball and Scroll Ring

The ball is very large that offers a good control, mounted over the square-shaped base. You can easily manipulate the ball with your fingers for hours without creating any strain on your wrist.

There is a large rubber scroll ring the surrounds the ball and move very smoothly.

In 2015, we surveyed readers to find out what makes a great wireless mouse. Most of our readers prioritized comfort (which includes grip, how the mouse glides across a surface, and overall feel), sensor performance and type, connection type and dongle size, button placement and variety, useful software, battery life, and warranty coverage.

Comfort

Size: Comfort can vary based on hand size, so we sought out average hand measurements for adults. Using hand anthropometric data collected by the Georgia Tech Research Institute (taken from studies conducted in 200and 2008), we combined men’s and women’s hand measurements to find that the average palm size is inches, while the average middle finger length is 2.9inches. We also broke down a 198study of hand anthropometry commissioned by the US Army and found similar results: a 4-inch average from the base of the participants’ palm to the base of the middle finger, and a 3.23-inch average from the base of the middle finger to the tip.

Grip: Among our survey participants, the most common mouse grip was fingertip at 4percent, followed by palm at 3percent and claw at 1percent. (All three grips are demonstrated in the image above.) We used all three grips with every mouse we tested in order to evaluate comfort.

Handedness: We found that 9percent of our respondents use their right hand to operate a mouse, even though only 8percent of the readers surveyed said they were right-handed. (In fact, one of the panel members during our 201testing was a lefty who uses a mouse with his right hand.) We previously tested a dozen ambidextrous mice, but we didn’t find a great full-size mouse for the percent of left-handed mousers.

Connection: The wireless signal shouldn’t cut out during ordinary use across short distances.

Connection options: Some mice can connect only via a 2.GHz radio-frequency (RF) USB wireless receiver—aka a dongle—others connect via Bluetooth only, and some mice support both. Wireless mice that support Bluetooth and USB dongles are the most convenient for most people because they will fit every situation, but they also tend to be more expensive. Most people don’t need to spend the extra money for that capability, but it’s a nice bonus.

Dongle size: If your mouse uses a wireless receiver to connect to your device, that dongle should be as unobtrusive as possible. The receiver should extend beyond the USB port far enough to let you get a good grip to remove it, but no farther, and it shouldn’t block adjacent USB ports.

Buttons: Every wireless mouse should have the standard right- and left-click buttons. Half of our respondents said that they use the back and forward buttons on the side of the mouse, so we looked for mice that have at least two side buttons for added functionality (although many offer more than that). We also noted the placement of the buttons and whether they’re awkward to use.

Useful software: Many wireless mice come with bundled software that allows you to track battery life and customize buttons, sensitivity, acceleration, scroll speed, and more.

Battery life: A great wireless mouse should last a few months on a charge, at the very least. Constantly replacing batteries is an inconvenience, and when some mice offer years of battery life, there’s no reason to settle for less.

Warranty: Although most defects covered by the warranty should present themselves within the first year of use, longer warranties are nice to have.

In 2017, we researched 60 mice from major manufacturers such as Apple, HP, Logitech, and Microsoft and found 1new models we wanted to test: The Anker 2.4G Wireless, Logitech M220, Logitech M330, Logitech M535, Logitech M585, Logitech M590, Logitech MX Anywhere 2S, Logitech MX Master 2S, Microsoft Designer Bluetooth Mouse, Microsoft Surface Mouse, TeckNet Pro, and VicTsing MM05We also retested our previous top picks—Logitech’s Marathon Mouse M705, MX Master, Performance Mouse MX, and M720 Triathlon, and Microsoft’s Bluetooth Mobile Mouse 3600.

How we tested

We put each wireless mouse through a battery of sensor tests based on those that manufacturers use to test gaming mice to rule out any subpar sensors. We also tested each mouse on a variety of common mousing surfaces, including a desk, a hard mouse pad, a soft mouse pad, a wood floor, fabric, glass, and a mirror. We then used each mouse for part of our workday, every day, for a week to evaluate comfort, button placement, and software.

In 2015, we put together a panel of people with varying hand sizes to test wireless mice and discuss which they liked and disliked to supplement our survey results. We did this again in 2017, bringing in seven new panelists to test previous picks and new contenders. We measured each panel member’s mousing hand from the base of the palm to the base of the middle finger, from the base of the middle finger to the tip, and from the tip of the thumb to the tip of the pinkie with the panelist’s hand spread wide.

Though our panelists in both 201and 201had a wide range of hand sizes, their average measurements align with the average hand measurements we found in other studies: inches (palm), 3.inches (finger), and 7.inches (spread).

The inexpensive Marathon is comfortable for a variety of hand sizes and grips, and it tracks accurately on most surfaces.

After two years, the Logitech Marathon Mouse M70is still the best mouse for most people because of its low price and excellent balance of features: medium size, ergonomic shape, eight customizable buttons, long battery life, and Logitech’s Unifying Receiver, which lets you connect up to six Logitech keyboards and pointing devices via a single USB port. Although it can’t connect via Bluetooth, and its software is less intuitive than the newer Logitech software used by most of our other picks, the inexpensive Marathon is the best mouse for most people who want to plug in their mouse and go to town.

The Marathon’s sensor tracked smoothly on nearly all of our test surfaces, but without Logitech’s high-end Darkfield sensor, present in more-expensive mice, it doesn’t work well on glass and mirrors. And while a few readers have noted that the Marathon’s off-center sensor makes the pointer difficult to control, none of our testing panel (across all grips) experienced these issues, so we don’t think this is common. If you’re concerned, take a look at our other picks, which all have centered sensors.

The Marathon has an unobtrusive Unifying Receiver for easy plug and play; it can’t connect over Bluetooth.

The Marathon comes with a Logitech Unifying Receiver, a 2.GHz USB dongle that extends beyond the USB port just far enough so you can get a good grip to remove it. If you have another Logitech device that supports the Unifying Receiver, you can use Logitech’s SetPoint software for Windows or Logitech’s Control Center software for Mac to connect multiple devices to the same dongle, freeing up valuable USB ports. The Marathon can’t connect over Bluetooth like most of our other picks, but most people who just want plug and play shouldn’t pay extra for Bluetooth yet. The Marathon also may not be the best option if you own a new computer that has only USB-C ports, since you’d have to connect its USB-A Unifying Receiver to an adapter or hub.

All of the Marathon’s nine buttons are well-placed and easy to reach: left-click, right-click, a button to toggle between ratcheted and infinite scrolling (smooth scrolling that lets you glide to the top or bottom of a page quickly), forward and back buttons on the left side of the mouse, an application-switcher button on the bottom left of the grip, and a scroll wheel that you can tilt left or right and press down. The left- and right-clicks are satisfyingly springy, and the side buttons are solid without feeling mushy. Our only complaint is with the application-switcher button on the thumb rest: It works just fine, but we found it difficult to locate by touch.

You can customize all the buttons (except the scrolling toggle) with Logitech SetPoint or Control Center software. This older software—replaced by Logitech Options on newer mice—tracks battery life and allows you to customize sensitivity, acceleration, scroll speed, and other settings, but the Marathon also works as a plug-and-play device if you don’t want to mess around with granular adjustments. Without the software, the thumb-rest button and the scroll-wheel tilt buttons don’t work, but all other buttons are operational. Although Logitech’s SetPoint and Control Center software don’t have the intuitive design of its newer Options software (which works with most of our other picks), it gets the job done.

After we used the Marathon for a few full days of work, SetPoint indicated that the Marathon’s battery was still full, giving an estimate of 1,08days (nearly three years) of use remaining. We used the same mouse on and off for a year and a half, and the battery was still nearly full, with an estimate of 89days (about two and a half years) remaining. We haven’t used it every day, but even so: This mouse feels like it might never die.

The Logitech Triathlon (right) has a higher back arch than our top pick, the Logitech Marathon (left).

Seven new panelists tested the Triathlon in 2017, and they ranked it the second-most comfortable wireless mouse behind the Logitech Marathon M70Everyone liked the grip and the button placement of the Triathlon, but one panelist pointed out that it didn’t fit their hand as well as the Marathon because of the Triathlon’s higher back arch. (The highest point of the Triathlon measures inches, about a half-inch taller than the Marathon, which stands at 1.inches.) The Triathlon is coated in a grippy matte plastic that was enjoyable to use for a full workday and didn’t make our palms sweat.

As with the Marathon, the Triathlon’s sensor aced all of our surface tests except glass and mirror. If you need a mouse with a better sensor, check out our upgrade pick. The Triathlon’s sensor is centered, unlike the Marathon’s, so we don’t expect any issues controlling its pointer.

The Triathlon’s third side button allows you to switch between three paired Bluetooth devices.

It has the same nine buttons as the Marathon Mouse M705, plus the Bluetooth device toggle. The Triathlon’s buttons share the Marathon’s buttons’ strengths and weaknesses, with crisp left- and right-click panels and responsive, easy-to-reach side buttons, but a mushy application-switcher button on the bottom of its grip.

You can customize all of the Triathlon’s buttons except the scrolling toggle, pairing toggle, and left- and right-click buttons. Although its left- and right-click buttons are swappable, you can’t program them to do anything else like you can with the Marathon. The Triathlon works with Logitech’s latest Options software, which tracks battery life and allows you to customize sensitivity, as well as pointer speed, scrolling speed, scroll direction, and smooth scrolling. Options is much more intuitive and enjoyable to use than the older SetPoint and Control Center apps.

Logitech claims that the Triathlon’s battery will last for two years, although we haven’t been able to test that. We used the Triathlon for a handful of days over the course of a month, though, and the Options software said that the battery was still completely full. It also comes with a one-year limited hardware warranty, compared with the Marathon’s three years.

Logitech MX Master 2S Wireless Mouse

If you spend all day using a mouse, we recommend spending more for the Logitech MX Master 2S. Our panel found it comfortable for all grips and hand sizes, even though it’s a bit larger and heavier than the Marathon. The MX Master 2S is an upgrade over our main pick in just about every way: It has a better sensor, it can pair and switch between multiple Bluetooth devices, it has six programmable buttons and a second scroll wheel for your thumb, it supports Logitech’s Flow software, and it has a rechargeable battery.

The MX Master 2S’s contoured shape and thumb rest make it comfortable to use for long periods. All our panel members liked its size and shape and praised the comfy soft-touch coating. Our largest-handed tester still preferred the size and palm support of the Logitech Performance Mouse MX, our pick for very large hands, and one of our smaller-handed testers liked the Marathon Mouse M705’s size better. But even those two agreed that the MX Master 2S was a comfortable fit. The MX Master 2S measures 3.inches wide, inches long, and inches tall, and it weighs 5.ounces—larger and heavier than the Marathon all around, but smaller than the Performance.

Our upgrade pick uses Logitech’s Darkfield sensor, and in our tests it worked on all surfaces, including glass and mirrors. Like our runner-up, the MX Master 2S can pair with up to three devices via Bluetooth and lets you quickly switch between them (in this case, by pressing a button on the bottom of the mouse). If your computer doesn’t have Bluetooth, or if you prefer a dongle, the MX Master 2S can also connect via an included 2.GHz wireless Logitech Unifying Receiver. But the Master 2S offers no place to store the dongle inside, unlike most wireless mice that have dongles.

The Logitech MX Master 2S has a second programmable scroll wheel on its side.

The MX Master 2S’s primary scroll wheel feels crisp but lacks left and right tilt. You can switch it between ratcheted and infinite scrolling, and you can toggle between them using a remappable button just below the scroll wheel. The MX Master 2S also has SmartShift, which automatically switches between scrolling modes based on how fast you flick the wheel. (SmartShift worked surprisingly well in our tests, but it can be frustrating if it triggers too easily. You can adjust the sensitivity of the feature using the Logitech Options software, or disable it completely if you dislike it.) The Master 2S’s back and forward buttons are stacked at a diagonal angle, though, which makes them somewhat awkward to use. And like the Triathlon and Marathon, the MX Master 2S’s thumb-rest button is mushy and difficult to press.

The Master 2S supports Logitech Options, as well as Logitech Flow, which lets you move your cursor between multiple computers—even between Mac and Windows—on the same network. You can also copy content and drag files from one computer to the other.

The MX Master 2S has shorter battery life than the Marathon or Triathlon. Logitech claims the MX Master 2S will last up to 70 days on a single charge, while the Marathon and Triathlon last for years. We used the Master 2S on and off for around three weeks, which consumed about a third of its battery life according to the battery meter in the software. At this rate, we expect it to last for nearly 70 days. Three LEDs embedded in the palm rest display the battery level when you turn the mouse on, and the Options software also notifies you on your computer when the MX Master 2S’s battery is running low. The battery recharges via the included Micro-USB–to–USB cable (or any similar cable), and you can continue to use the mouse while it’s charging. But because the battery is built in and can’t be replaced, you’ll have to buy a new mouse someday when that battery degrades and no longer holds a charge.

The MX Master has a one-year limited hardware warranty—shorter than the three-year warranty Logitech offers for the Marathon and the Performance MX—but most defects covered by the warranty should present themselves within the first year of use anyway.

A mouse for larger hands

The Performance Mouse MX is our pick for giant hands. It’s larger and cheaper than the MX Master 2S, but it’s too large for most people.

If you have big hands or prefer large mice, we recommend the Logitech Performance Mouse MX. The Performance is even larger than our upgrade pick, making it the most comfortable to use for larger-handed people. Plus, it has nine programmable buttons, more than any of our other picks. But it has a mediocre scroll wheel and it lacks the MX Master 2S’s thumb scroll wheel, Bluetooth, and support for Logitech’s latest software. This mouse costs nearly twice as much as our main pick, but it’s much cheaper than the MX Master 2S, so if you have huge hands and want to spend less, the Performance MX is a great option.

The Logitech Performance Mouse MX (right) is longer and wider than the Marathon Mouse M70(left) and the Logitech MX Master 2S (middle), making it better suited for larger hands.

Five out of seven panel members said the Performance was too large to use comfortably every day, but our two largest-handed testers said this mouse—which measures 5.inches long, 3.inches wide, and 1.inch tall—fit their hands just right. For comparison, the Marathon Mouse M70is considerably more compact at 4.inches by 2.inches by 1.inch, with the MX Master 2S falling in between the two at inches by 3.inches by inches. Four panel members mentioned that the contour of this mouse dug into their palm on the pinkie side, near the wrist. The MX Master 2S, our upgrade pick, did not have this problem.

Like our top pick, the Performance Mouse MX uses Logitech’s Unifying Receiver instead of Bluetooth to connect to your laptop.

The Performance has a Darkfield sensor, like the MX Master 2S, which allows it to track smoothly on all surfaces, including glass and mirrors. The Performance connects only via Logitech’s Unifying Receiver, though; it doesn’t have Bluetooth like the MX Master 2S.

The Performance Mouse MX has nine customizable buttons, more than any of our other picks: the same button selection as the Marathon, plus an additional Zoom button on the left side. We preferred the MX Master 2S’s fantastic thumb scroll wheel in place of the Performance’s Zoom button, though. We also didn’t like the Performance MX’s scroll wheel, even though it tilts unlike the MX Master 2S’s. Ratcheted scrolling feels imprecise, and the scroll wheel’s built-in down button feels mushy. The Performance MX’s application-switcher button in the thumb rest is surrounded by a plastic frame with a sharp edge that can dig into your thumb, another problem unique to this mouse.

The Performance works with Logitech’s older SetPoint and Control Center software, and doesn’t support Logitech Options and Flow like the MX Master 2S does.

The Performance Mouse MX comes with a three-year limited warranty.

The competition

The wireless mice we tested in 2017, as well as our top picks from 2016.

We tested the TeckNet Classic Wireless Mouse M00and TeckNet Pro 2.4G Ergonomic Wireless Mobile Optical Mouse—popular, inexpensive mice that look similar to the Marathon Mouse M70Both models have fewer buttons than the Marathon and lack infinite scrolling, plus their scroll wheels feel mushier than the Marathon’s and they lack software for customizing the mice. Although they’re reasonably comfortable for the price, we don’t recommend them over our top pick.

The VicTsing MM052.4G Wireless Portable Mobile Mouse is another popular cheap mouse that looks similar to the Marathon, but it wasn’t as comfortable in our testing. It also has fewer buttons, lacks infinite scrolling, feels less sturdily built, and lacks customization software.

Our former upgrade pick, the Logitech MX Master, has been replaced by the Logitech MX Master 2S. Compared with the older version, the 2S supports Logitech Flow and has longer battery life—70 days, up from 40, according to Logitech. If you don’t care about longer battery life, or Logitech Flow support, the MX Master is still a great mouse for nearly half the price.

Our panel described the unusually shaped Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Mouse (aka Sculpt Ergo) as “surprisingly comfortable” and praised its great scroll wheel. Its unusual shape forces a very specific grip, however, and our testers didn’t like the glossy surface, the mushy side button, or the intrusive Windows button. Our smallest-handed tester said the Sculpt Ergo was too big, and our largest-handed tester said it was too small.

Microsoft’s Sculpt Comfort Mouse sports a large blue strip with a Windows logo that opens the start menu when pressed, and supports swipe-up and swipe-down gestures that work in Windows. It has a great scroll wheel, but our panel didn’t like the glossy-plastic surface and thought the mouse was too flat and too long.

We tested the older Microsoft Arc Touch Mouse Surface Edition, which has a touchpad in place of a scroll wheel that provides audible and haptic feedback. But the touchpad is unreliable, and the underside of the Arc Touch is hollow when in use, which means the mouse has a terribly uncomfortable grip. Our complaints with the Arc Touch Mouse’s grip apply to its successor, the Surface Arc Mouse, too.

The Microsoft Wireless Mobile Mouse 4000 has one fewer side button than our top pick, and all our testers agreed that it was a little too small. The scroll wheel lacks ratcheted scrolling, and most panel members said the scroll wheel was too smooth to use effectively.

The Logitech M220 Silent and Logitech M330 Silent have no buttons beyond left-click and right-click and cost the same as our top pick. The M220 also felt like a cheap toy; when we picked it up, we could hear what sounded like rattling parts inside.

The HP X4000b Bluetooth Mouse has only three buttons, and our panel registered a variety of complaints about its design.

When our panelists tried out the Kensington SureTrack Any Surface Wireless Bluetooth Mouse, they noted its lack of palm support and low-set, mushy scroll wheel. Its sensor also jumped a little on textured surfaces in some of our tests.

The Logitech Ultrathin Touch Mouse T630 was one of two Bluetooth touch mice we tested (along with the Apple Magic Mouse, below), and our panel universally disliked it. This model comes with a very short, 4.5-inch micro-USB cable that plugs into the underside of the mouse, rendering the T630 unusable when charging. Most gestures worked reliably, but the T630 had trouble differentiating between one-finger and two-finger swipes.

Apple’s Magic Mouse is too flat and uncomfortable for extended use. You also have no way to take advantage of the Magic Mouse’s best feature—its integrated touch surface—on Windows. (Without additional software, it will pair with a Windows machine and work like a basic mouse, giving you cursor control, left-click, and right-click.) By installing the bootcamped drivers available here, you can add a battery-life indicator as well as natural and one-finger scrolling to Windows, but no other functions are available.

Jump back.

USB 3.0 ports and devices have been shown to radiate radio-frequency noise (PDF) that can interfere with the performance of devices using the 2.GHz wireless band. Affected devices include both mice that rely on 2.GHz radio-frequency USB dongles and mice that connect via Bluetooth. The noise can radiate from a port on your computer, a port on the connected device, or the cable connecting the two. For example, if you have a USB 3.0 hard drive plugged into a USB 3.0 port, the interference can come from the port on your computer, the USB cord, or even the drive’s USB connection. If your wireless mouse constantly drops its connection, you should try plugging it into a USB 2.0 port, if available, and keep the dongle and mouse away from active USB 3.0 ports and devices. If you’re still having trouble, you can plug your wireless device into a USB 2.0 extender to move it farther from the source of the interference.

Sources

Get best deal in Goodson Cash Drawer Ivory with Solenoid at Quick POS Australia.

Buy Cash Drawer Posiflex from best online seller in Australia. OnlyPOS have ware-house in Sydney deals with Posiflex Cash Drawers & many other POS solutions at LOW Rates.

 

 

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the trackball for gaming by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

Final Word

First of all thanks for reading my article to the end! I hope you find my reviews listed here useful and that it allows you to make a proper comparison of what is best to fit your needs and budget. Don’t be afraid to try more than one product if your first pick doesn’t do the trick.

Most important, have fun and choose your trackball for gaming wisely! Good luck!

So, TOP3 of trackball for gaming

 

 

Questions? Leave a comment below!

Chatting about trackball for gaming is my passion! Leave me a question in the comments, I answer each and every one and would love to get to know you better!



Leave a comment!

Let us know what you have to say:

RECENTLY REVIEWED
Best outdoor projectors of 2018
Best aux cord of 2018
Best laptop cooler for gaming of 2018
Best external bluray drive of 2018
Best rechargeable c batteries of 2018


AFFILIATE DISCLOSURE

Some posts may contain affiliate links. proguide50.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.
FOLLOW US

       
 
COPYRIGHT © 2017 · proguide50.com · ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
DMCA.com Protection Status