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Best external blu ray drive 2018 – [Buyer’s Guide]

Last Updated December 1, 2018
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Arnold SimmonsHi! My name is Arnold Simmons. Here are the best external blu ray drive for 2018 – based on my own expert opinion, feature sets, prices, and overall popularity.

I’ll brush up on how to choose the best external blu ray drive and examine things like materials, quality, and weight. So, you will find reviews on some models of external blu ray drive that impressed me (and a good many other people), and you will find a few informational pages as well.

Best external blu ray drive of 2018

I am going to specify each good-to-buy feature as much as possible for your references. If you’re scouring the market for the best external blu ray drive, you’d better have the right info before spending your money. Here, I will review 3 of the best external blu ray drive of 2018, and we will also discuss the things to consider when looking to purchase one. I hope you will make an informed decision after going through each of them. There’s a product for every kind of user on the list of affordable options below.

Test Results and Ratings

Rank №1 №2 №3
Product
Total 4.8 4.5 4.3
Style
5 points
5 points
4 points
Size
5 points
4 points
5 points
Performance
5 points
5 points
4 points
Value
4 points
4 points
4 points
Awards 1
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How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the external blu ray drive by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

№1 – Pawtec Slim External Aluminum Slot-Loading BDXL Blu-Ray Writer / Burner for PC Windows or Apple Mac iMac MacBook

 
Pawtec Slim External Aluminum Slot-Loading BDXL Blu-Ray Writer / Burner for PC Windows or Apple Mac iMac MacBook

Pros
EFFORTLESS SETUP – Just plug into your USB Port and the Blu-Ray writer will be detected. Works with Windows 2000, XP, Vista, 7, 8, 8.1, 10 and Mac OS X
VERSATILE – Ability to read and write CD, DVD and Blu-Ray disc. Constructed with industry leading slot loading Blu-Ray writer.
Cons
Literally no flaws
 
Total:
4.8

Why did this external blu ray drive win the first place?

I don’t know anything about other models from this brand, but I am fully satisfied with this product. I really enjoy the design. It is compact, comfortable and reliable. And it looks amazing! I was completely satisfied with the price. Its counterparts in this price range are way worse. The product is very strong. Its material is stable and doesn’t crack.

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Style
5

5star

Size
5

5star

Performance
5

5star

Value
4

4star

 

 

№2 – OWC Mercury Pro 16X Blu-ray

 
OWC Mercury Pro 16X Blu-ray

Pros
Aluminum housed desktop optical drive with USB 3.0 and M-DISC support for reliable long-term storage.
Archive quality M-DISC compatibility
Mac and PC compatible: OS X 10.6 and later; Windows XP and later
Cons
It stank for a few days. The smell didn’t wear off for a long time..
A little more expensive than comparable models.
 
Total:
4.5

Why did this external blu ray drive come in second place?

This is a pretty decent product that perfectly fitted the interior of our office. I recommend you to consider buying this model, it definitely worth its money. I really liked it. It is amazing in every aspect. It did even exceed my expectations for a bit, considering the affordable price. Seems that the material is good. It has a very beautiful color but I don’t really like the texture.

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Style
5

5star

Size
4

4star

Performance
5

5star

Value
4

4star

 

 

№3 – Pioneer Electronics USA Slim External Blu Ray Drive BDR-XD05S Silver

 
Pioneer Electronics USA Slim External Blu Ray Drive BDR-XD05S Silver

Pros
Pioneer Slim BDRW/DVDRW BDR-XD05S 6x USB3
Cons
Quit bulky.
The price is clearly unaffordable for the most buyers..
 
Total:
4.3

Why did this external blu ray drive take third place?

It is inconvenient to use due to the size. I am going to get something different next time. I liked the design. We’ve been using it for 2 months and it still looks like brand new. This price is appropriate since the product is very well built. The material is incredibly nice to the touch. It has a great color, which will suit any wallpapers.

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Style
4

4star

Size
5

5star

Performance
4

4star

Value
4

4star

 

 

external blu ray drive Buyer’s Guide

If you keep the before points in mind, you can easily go out to the market and buy external blu ray drive, right? No!

Who this is for

Over years of testing, we’ve found that external optical drives have few big differences between them—they tend to look alike and perform similarly. If you already have an optical drive that serves you well and works with the discs you have, you won’t gain much, if anything, from upgrading to one of our picks.

Pull Quote

If you still need an optical drive, but only sometimes, you’re better off getting one that connects via USB rather than buying a chunky laptop with a built-in drive.

You also shouldn’t buy a portable drive for a desktop computer that has room for an internal drive, because drives with a dedicated power source tend to be faster and cheaper than portable USB-powered options. Nor should you buy one to use with a tablet.

How we picked

The most important features for an optical drive are speed, size and weight, and noise. Price and availability are also important, as we’ve seen models disappear completely or become fare for third-party price-gougers as optical drives become less necessary to most people.

Speed: The speed of an external drive has two components, namely the drive’s read and write speeds, and the speed at which data travels between the drive and the computer. Theoretically, a 6x Blu-ray drive, for example, should need only a USB 2.0 connection, since the drive writes at a maximum of 2megabytes per second, and USB 2.0 reaches about 35 MB/s. In practice, however, the USB 3.0 drives we tested (such as our top Blu-ray pick) were faster than the USB 2.0 models. Most affordable models use USB 2.0.

Size and weight: About 7percent of the more than 300 people who responded to our survey said they used their external optical drive only at home, but enough people travel with one that both size and weight are important considerations. Plus, a more compact drive is easier to store when you’re not using it.

Noise: All optical drives make noise, but the drive shouldn’t drown out, say, the movie or show you’re trying to watch.

Sturdiness: Few external disc drives are pretty, but the case shouldn’t fall apart under light pressure, the connections shouldn’t be wobbly, and the buttons need to work when you press them.

Bus-powered (single-cable) operation: Most recent computers provide enough power to run an optical drive off a single USB cable, but some older laptops (such as the 20MacBook Air) don’t provide enough juice to a single port. For those computers, you’ll need a Y-cable that plugs into two USB ports to power the drive. Drives that come with a Y-cable, whether built-in or separate, provide some handy foolproofing. We didn’t test larger external drives that required their own power cord, as we saw those drives as being too expensive and bulky for most people’s needs.

With those criteria in mind, we scoured retailers for the best-selling and top-rated optical drives, and we checked manufacturer websites for models released since our previous update.

The competition

The LG GP70NS50 burned and ripped DVDs at about the same speeds as other drives we tested in 2017, but it currently costs more than our picks, and its silver paint scratched a few times in our travels. It’s a fine drive otherwise, and worth the investment if you can find it on sale.

The Samsung SE-208GB was our previous top DVD pick for this guide, due to its uncanny speed at ripping DVDs in Windows and its convenient top-mounted eject button and light. But it’s no longer available consistently at its prior price, and Samsung seems to have discontinued all of its optical drives after the bankruptcy of its TSST partnership with Toshiba. The same lack of availability eliminates the Samsung SE-218GP and the Samsung SE-506CB Slim Blu-ray Writer, also former picks.

At this writing, the Buffalo DVSM-PT58U2VB (aka the Buffalo MediaStation) costs more than our picks, but in our tests it ripped and burned DVDs at roughly the same speeds. It’s also a half-inch bigger on one side. The built-in Y-cable is worth paying for only to someone who travels a good deal with a low-power laptop.

The LG SP80NB60 is cheaper than our picks—and feels like it. This model ripped and burned at roughly the same speeds in our tests, but the USB connection felt loose, and we could feel the components of the drive shifting inside the case.

In our tests, the Dell DW31was notably slower (by about 1minutes) at burning DVDs on Windows. It currently costs more than our picks, and it’s not always in stock at retailers other than Dell. If you were buying a Dell laptop and needed an external drive mostly for reading discs, this model would not be a bad add-on purchase, but you can do better otherwise.

The Pioneer BDR-XD0was a former Blu-ray drive pick, but the company has replaced it with the BDR-XD05B.

The Archgon MD-3107S is large, heavy, and expensive, and it doesn’t come with Windows software. We also encountered several errors when trying to play DVDs that worked without issue on the other drives.

The Pioneer BDR-XU0has positive owner ratings and is thin and light, but is too expensive right now.

Pawtec’s drives (in black, orange, and red) have poor ratings, and the red model does not write Blu-rays.

Sources

All the external Blu-ray drives we tested, from top: Pioneer XD05, Samsung SE-506CB, Buffalo MediaStation BDXL, Samsung SE-506BB, and Archgon MD-3107S.

Then we chose four Blu-ray drives and one DVD-only drive to go head-to-head against our previous pick, the Samsung SE-506BB Blu-ray drive. We tested the Buffalo MediaStation BDXL, the new Samsung SE-506CB Blu-ray drive, the Pioneer BDR-XD05, the Archgon MD-3107S, and the Samsung SE-218CB DVD drive (for people who don’t care about Blu-rays).

Our Pick

Our pick was the quietest drive we tested, and it’s conveniently thin and light for storage or portable use. The Samsung was the fastest to rip a Blu-ray to an MKV file. It was a few minutes slower than the competition in our other tests, but all the drives we tested (except the pricier Pioneer) take more than an hour to rip and burn Blu-rays.

The best external Blu-ray drive for most people is the Samsung SE-506CB.

The Samsung comes with the CyberLink Media Suite for playing DVDs and Blu-rays. This software works only on Windows, though, so Mac users will have to purchase other software or use other programs which are free, but technically illegal in the US, to watch Blu-rays.

Flaws but not dealbreakers

The Samsung’s biggest flaw is that it’s a little bit slower at burning and ripping DVDs and Blu-rays and the other drives we tested. However, it was within minutes of the competition in almost all our tests, which take over an hour each.

Audio Support

In the early days of the Blu-ray format most players could not internally decode HD multichannel audio formats such as Dolby TrueHD or DTS HD MA. Some players could decode either Dolby TrueHD or DTS HD Master Audio, but not both. Buyers without a receiver capable of decoding of the compressed audio would often seek that feature when considering which player to purchase. Today, most of the players on the market (even the inexpensive models) are capable of decoding all the Blu-ray lossless audio formats and sending them as a LPCM signal to your receiver or HDTV. If you have a high end home theater receiver, you might prefer for the Blu-ray player to bitstream and have the receiver work the decoding. Bitstreaming (sending the compressed HD audio signal to the receiver as a raw digital stream) is also supported by most of the current players.

Format support for SACDs (Super Audio CD) and DVD-Audio discs are essential features for lovers of high resolution music. SACD and DVD-Audio compatibility are usually not included with inexpensive players, but as a premium feature on medium or higher priced models.

USB Port

Connects a digital camera or thumb drive to view video or music. The port can also be utilized for external memory needed in many BD Live features.

The player comes equipped with all the devices required for it to access a wireless network.

Wireless or USB Keyboard Support

Internal devices are installed inside your computer case and connect directly to your motherboard, usually through a SATA or similar connection. These devices are typically the fastest ones you can choose, but once installed, you cannot easily use them with a different computer.

External

External Blu-Ray burners, on the other hand, are not actually installed into your system and simply connect to your computer through a USB or eSATA port. These burners are sometimes slower than internal models, but it is very easy to unplug them and connect them to a different computer on the fly.

Cache Size

The cache size, or cache memory, represents physical memory in the Blu-ray burner used to temporarily store data before transferring it to a computer or writing it to a disc. This is a pretty simple specification and obviously the more memory/larger cache size is better. You should look for a burner with at least a full 1MB of memory but 4MB or more is definitely preferable. This helps ensure fast, smooth burning and minimizes opportunities for data corruption.

Burn Speed

Quite simply, burn speed indicates the maximum speed at which data can be written to a disc. In general, most Blu-Ray burners have about the same speed for older media types like DVD and CDs, so really look at Blu-Ray write speed. At the very least you should pick a model with a maximum speed of 12X (especially for an external device) but a speed of 16X is preferable.

An internal burner should have a maximum speed of 16X to ensure fast writing, but external devices usually burn a bit slower. One thing to keep in mind is that burn speeds to rewritable discs (BD-RE) are often much slower, so look at BD-R speed for burning to a standard Blu-Ray disc.

Access Time

The access time, also referred to as BD-ROM access time, indicates how long it takes for a drive to receive a request for data from a system and then fulfill it. What it comes down to is that you want to find a burner that receives and relays data quickly, which means lower times are better.

Look for an access time of less than 200ms for an internal device, while external devices will probably be closer to about 240ms. Anything above 300ms is going to be noticeably slower than other models when accessing data, so you probably want to avoid models with such high times.

Additional Features

As you consider different Blu-Ray burners, keep in mind any extra features and options provided by various models. The software included with a burner can be very important, including both burning programs as well as software for reading data. If you want to play Blu-Ray movies through your computer, then you should definitely look for a burner that includes software for playing media.

You should also consider models with M-DISC support, which is a type of media designed to withstand heat, erosion, and weathering. If you want to keep your data around as long as possible, M-DISC is worth looking for, though you then need appropriate Blu-Ray discs.

What to Choose

Similarly, if you only want a drive to play DVDs or CDs, then a cheaper model will be fine. While external DVD burners are still very reasonable at a starting price of around £20, deciding on what you will be using the drive for is the best starting point.

Connecting Your Drive

There are currently two versions of USB slots around. USB 2.0 is the standard variety that nearly all computers have while USB 3.0 is the faster version that is the future. USB 3.0 offers transfer rates that are ten times faster and will become the norm in the future, but at the moment the two versions can cause issues.

Many newer laptops will have at least one USB 3.0 port, which is usually blue. Some of the best external DVD drives will be powered by USB 3.0 and will often clearly advertise the fact.

Write Speed

Write speed is the time it takes for a drive to create a new disk. Copying movies or music onto a disk is one of the most useful features of a disk drive and the write speed determines how long that process will take.

Choosing a write speed is all about what the drive will be used for. If you just want to watch movies on the go, a low speed is fine but if you plan on copying a large amount of files, then go for one of the best external DVD drives with something above 20X.

An external DVD drive and writer is the only way to play and burn files onto CDs and DVDs if you do not have a built-in disc writer on your laptop.

Special Features

Silent Play – Reduces noise when playing or writing discs.

Buffer Underrun Free – Prevents common errors when burning discs.

TV Link – Connects to any TV that supports flash drives and allows you to access files on the disc drive.

Slim and Lightweight Design – Will be of importance to you if you plan on taking the device travelling.

Generally, manufacturers term the above features differently for their own branding but they pretty much do the same thing.

Size & Speed

For regular backups (which run on an hourly, daily, or weekly basis) your main priority should be a drive that is somewhat larger than the capacity of your computer’s internal drive. This enables you to store multiple copies of each file, which is good in case some files get corrupted.

Speed isn’t overly important in this context. Backups are incremental: the first backup will create copies of every file on your drive, but subsequent backups will only save those that have since been changed. As such, unless you’re working with very large files on a daily basis, the amount of data being backed up at any given time is small.

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Extra Features

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Remote Physical Storage

And what of other types of physical storage? Memory cards and USB flash drives are fast but are designed primarily for moving files from one location to another rather than for archiving. Although the data on them can last for decades — and they tend to be physically robust — they aren’t reliable enough for long term storage.

Cloud Storage

If you don’t want to back up locally, or if you want a secondary backup method, then you can look to the cloud. To back up your entire hard drive to the cloud, you’ll need to pay for storage on a monthly basis.

You’ll also need a fast Internet connection, with fast upload speeds in particular. Transferring tens of gigabytes of data to the cloud will take some time.

You also need to bear in mind the potential security implications of storing all your data in the cloud and read the privacy policy of your chosen provider. If you aren’t going with one of the big guns, you might want to check their service guarantees, too. It’s not unheard of for cloud services to suddenly close down.

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Why storage is so important

When you press that shutter release button, the camera does its thing and a fraction of a second later several million bytes of data needs a new home. It’s easy to regard that mass of data as simply an image file, but with modern digital photography it’s easy to generate thousands of image files consuming terabytes of storage space. Taking a picture or shooting a video is simple but what you do next requires a bit of thought – otherwise you’ll end up with a mass of randomly stored images and a big headache finding what you need in the future.

Ease of finding the photos you need

Once you’ve built up a sizeable archive of files, finding files you need can be a major problem. Fortunately, photo image files can be keyword tagged with appropriately meaningful words that can help you to find target images quickly and easily. You can use DAM (Digital Asset Management) software to build a robust database of tagged images, although even your computer’s operating system may be able to offer a rudimentary image tagging and searching facility. Storing your images in a logical structure of folders, perhaps arranged by date or subject, can also help, although I wouldn’t recommend this instead of tagging.

Hard disk drives

Hard disks are so named because there used to be a flexible or ‘floppy’ disk alternative. An electromagnetic read/write head ‘flies’ on a cushion of air, a tiny fraction of a millimetre above a magnetic disc (called a platter) that spins at up to 10,000 RPM. In principle the faster the platter spins the faster data can be written to it and read from it. The term ‘disk’ – with a ‘k’ – is historic and comes from the term ‘diskette’ or a small disc.

The most common hard drive spin speeds are 5400 and 7200RPM. Other performance factors include the drive’s cache memory and controller circuitry. Some 5400RPM drives can perform as well as, or even better than, some 7200RPM drives. Computer magazines regularly test batches of drives from different manufacturers and these tests can be a good guide to ultimate performance as well as value for money.

You may notice the term ‘green’ being used in the model name or description for a hard drive. This means that the drive has been designed to use less power and to operate at a lower temperature than the manufacturer’s standard drives. There may be a small penalty in performance, but not always. Sometimes ‘green’ drives are audibly quieter, too.

Hard disk drives are available in many capacities and several standard form factor sizes. Laptops generally use 2.inch drives, while desktop PCs traditionally use 3.inch drives (although some compact models use the smaller 2.inch drives). There are also super-small 1.inch drives sometimes used in netbooks. Until a few years ago one-inch drives incorporated into units the same size as a compact flash cards, called Microdrives, were in common use; solid state flash memory cards have now rendered Microdrives obsolete, but larger hard drives continue to improve steadily in performance and overall capacity.

The capacity of a hard drive depends on the density at which data can be written to the drive’s platter and how many platters are contained. In 3.inch sizes capacities commonly available are 500GB, or and terabytes (TB), respectively. A terabyte is a thousand gigabytes, or a million megabytes. 4TB 3.inch drives are now available and we may see even higher capacity drives in the near future.

2TB 2.inch drives are already available, although 250, 500 and 750GB 2.inch drives are the most commonly sold at present. Don’t assume that any 2.inch drive will fit inside your laptop as a replacement, because in order to accommodate extra platters the thickness or height of the drive could be greater than the space available. The most commonly used 2.inch drives are 9.5mm high, but some are as slim as 5mm and others as large as 15mm.

Optical media

As manufacturers of hard disk drives and flash memory devices have pushed the envelope and reduced costs while steadily increasing capacities, the relevance of optical media has waned. Recordable CDs and DVDs are slow and often unreliable, as well as offering only limited capacity. With 3and 64GB memory cards now commonly available, even recordable Blu-Ray discs, which remain stubbornly expensive, are unattractive for photo storage. Optical media does remain a viable option for creating slide shows and, of course, edited video movies.

Firewire

Firewire is a serial bus standard that works like a network and can operate as a chain of interconnected devices. Back when USB was just 1megabits per second Firewire was offering 400 megabit speeds, but Firewire never gained the ubiquity of USB. Later we had Firewire 800 (800 megabits/sec) but its adoption was once again far lower than USB 2.0.

SATA and eSATA

Most basic hard disk drives, or bare drives, and other devices like DVD or Blu-Ray drives, connect to their hosts using SATA (Serial ATA). SATA is a high performance data bus designed to work over relatively short cables, connecting fast storage devices like hard disk drives inside a computer’s case. eSATA is a version of SATA; this enables SATA devices to be connected externally while retaining the same level of performance as internal SATA drives. Using eSATA-connected drive docking stations is a convenient way of using multiple bare hard disk drives.

Backup software

It can’t be stressed enough how important it is to backup your data; it’s so important that backup facilities are now built into computer operating systems. There’s also a burgeoning market for independent vendors of backup software, and the best of these will offer solutions that are easier to use than OS-based offerings. This is an important point because you will tend not to use a system that is difficult to use, no matter how effective it might be. You can backup a complete computer system operating system, applications programs and your data files, or just the data files; it’s your choice.

Social media networks

Billions of photos are shot every day – more than at any time in the history of photography, though the number of prints made from photos is lower now than it has been for many years. Instead of printing photos they are being shown on social media networks like Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and others, including photo-centric networks like Flickr, Image Bucket, etc. Simplifying the sharing of photos to your preferred networks can save a lot of time. Look out for photo-sharing options in desktop software and, especially, image apps for smartphones and tablets.

Choosing the right size

Choosing your best laptop means getting the right balance between size and power.

The smallest, lightest laptops are usually the least powerful because they simply can’t carry as many components inside. To get something more powerful would mean choosing a device that’s a little larger and heavier.

Battery life

Typically it’s the most expensive laptops that have the best battery life. Some low cost models may have a longer life, but that’s a reflection of their reduced processing power, which requires less battery life.

Remember battery life is an estimate. High demand tasks will use up battery power faster than low demand tasks.

Quick Tips

If you’re in a hurry, these are the most important things to consider when choosing a new laptop. For a lot more detail, see the sections below.

12.5 to 14-inch  screens offer the best balance between usability and portability. Larger screens are fine if you don’t travel much and smaller models are great for kids.

SSD Storage instead of a hard drive.

8+ hours of battery life is ideal if you plan to take your laptop anywhere at all.

Consider a 2-in-if you want to use your laptop as a tablet. If not, a standard clamshell notebook may be a better choice.

Chromebooks are good for kids. Windows laptops and MacBooks both offer plenty of functionality; which platform you prefer is a matter of personal taste.

Chrome OS

Found on inexpensive “Chromebooks” such as the Lenovo 100S Chromebook, Google’s OS is simple and secure, but limited. The user interface looks a lot like Windows with an application menu, a desktop and the ability to drag windows around, but the main app you use is the Chrome browser. The downside is that many of the “web apps” you use don’t work particularly well offline. However, that’s changing as a few Chromebooks, including the high-end, Google PixelBook, can now run Android apps.

If you need a device to surf the Web and check email, navigate social networks and chat online, Chromebooks are highly portable and tend to offer good battery life at low prices. They are also extremely popular with schools and parents, because they are hard for kids to infect with malware.

Choose the Right Size

1to 1inches: Provides the best balance of portability and usability, particularly if you get a laptop that weighs under pounds.

1inches: The most popular size, 15-inch laptops usually weigh 4.to 6.pounds. Consider this size if you want a larger screen and you’re not planning to carry your notebook around often.

1to 1inches: If your laptop stays on your desk all day every day, a 17- or 18-inch system could provide you with the kind of processing power you need to play high-end games or do workstation-level productivity.

Here are the main components to keep an eye on.

CPU: The “brains” of your computer, the processor has a huge influence on performance, but depending on what you want to do, even the least-expensive model may be good enough. Here’s a rundown.

Intel Core i5: If you’re looking for a mainstream laptop with the best combination of price and performance, get one with an Intel Core iCPU. Models that end in U (ex: Core i5-7200U) are the most common.  Those with the a Y in the name are low power and have worse performance while models with an HQ use more wattage and appear in thicker gaming and workstation systems. Intel’s new 8th Generation, “Kaby Lake Refresh” CPUs have model numbers that begin with (ex: Core i5-8250U) and double the number of cores from two to four, which dramatically improves performance.

Intel Core i7: A step up from Core i5, which Models with numbers that end in HQ or K use higher wattage and have four cores, allowing for even faster gaming and productivity. There are also Core iY series chips that have lower power and performance. Keep an eye out for CPUs that have a in the model number (ex: Core i7-8250U) because they are part of Intel’s latest, 8th Generation Core Series, and offer better performance. However, 8th Gen processors are only available in the U series right now.

Intel Core i3: Performance is just a step below Core iand so is the price. If you can possibly step up to a Core i5, we recommend it.

AMD A, FX or E Series: Found on low-cost laptops, AMD’s processors — the company calls them APUs rather than CPUs —  provide decent performance for the money that’s good enough for web surfing, media viewing and productivity.

Intel Core m / Core i/ i”Y Series” — Low-power and low heat allow systems with these processors to go fanless. Performance is better than Celeron, but a notch below regular Core iU series.

Don’t Skimp on Battery Life

If you’re buying large, bulky notebook that you’ll use only on a desk near an outlet, you don’t have to worry about battery life. However, if you plan to use the laptop on your lap, even if it’s at home and or work, you’ll want at least hours of endurance, with 8+ hours being ideal. To determine a notebook’s expected battery life, don’t take the manufacturer’s word for it. Instead, read third-party results from objective sources, such as our reviews.

Sony BDP-S1500

Like the other Blu-ray players the BDP-S1500 also upscales standard definition DVD movies to near-HD quality.

You can also stream content from a variety of online entertainment providers (BBC iPlayer, YouTUbe, Skype and apps made for your TV via the Opera TV Store), via the Sony Entertainment Network.

The BDP-S1500 boasts a quick start so will deliver fast loading times, and it boots up in less than a second.

3D: No          Wi-Fi: No          Ethernet: Yes

The compact Sony BDP-S5500 offers not just Blu-ray and DVD playback, but also supports 3D Blu-rays discs. This Blu-ray Disc player also upscales 2D video to “simulated 3D” for enhanced depth and improved on-screen image detail.

With the BDP-S5500’s built-in super Wi-Fi Pro, you can browse the best online entertainment on the big screen. Smooth, fast streaming means you’ll enjoy Internet content with fewer interruptions and greater picture quality. Upscaled and native 3D Blu-ray movies also come to life in Full HD 3D for a more immersive viewing experience.

Like the BDP-S1500 it is compatible with Sony’s exclusive TRILUMINOS colour technology.

Enjoy all the fine detail of the original recording in clear, high-fidelity surround sound with Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD. DLNA allows you to share multimedia content across all supported devices in your home. The USB slot is handily positioned on the front.

3D: Yes          Wi-Fi: Yes          Ethernet: Yes

The no-nonsense, compact LG BP250 is a Blu-ray and DVD player that also allows you to play videos, photos and music via a USB drive (handy slot on the front).

Like the other players here it will also upscale your DVD collection to near-HD quality.

While it won’t work with 3D discs and doesn’t offer smart TV apps most people won’t miss these extras. It has an HDMI slot on the back, but no Ethernet.

3D: No          Wi-Fi: No          Ethernet: No

The Song BDP-S7200 might cost more than the other Blu-ray drives listed here, but it does upscale Blu-ray Full HD content to 4K for the latest, high-resolution TVs. Audio playback is super high resolution too.

Its dual-core processor enables faster streaming, quicker loading and smoother playback.

3D: No         Wi-Fi: Yes          Ethernet: Yes

Backing up to optical media is becoming increasingly more popular – especially for photos, audio files and video. This optical drive includes all the software you need to archive your data on either a Mac or a PC. Don’t let your only copy be the one on your hard drive – optical media is durable, portable and easy to store.

Gallery

If your OWC or NewerTech brand product should require service during the warranty coverage period, we are committed to delivering the fastest possible service.

Upon receipt of your unit, OWC will make every attempt to service it and arrange shipping back to you all within 4weekday (Monday-Friday) business hours, excluding U.S. national holidays. This warranty service timeframe does not include data recovery attempts, out of stock items/components, or upgrade/product replacements.

Bundled accessories

When Blu-ray technology had just been introduced, they weren’t quite able to compete with DVD purely because they were more expensive and the market was still dominated by CRT TVs. With the ever growing popularity of HDTVs though, Blu-ray players have also become a must-have gadget in the modern living room. They have also caught up in terms of pricing. You can buy a decent Blu-ray player for as low as Rs. 5,000, just a bit more than DVD players.

Much like TVs, Blu-ray players have also evolved offering features such as 3D, internet connectivity, wireless streaming and many more. This makes it difficult to select a specific Blu-ray player. To help you out, we’ve come out with a list of must-have features you should look for, while buying a Blu-ray player for your TV.

Video format support

One of the biggest features to look out for, while buying a Blu-ray player is the number of file formats supported by it. Many of the Blu-ray players today can handle USB drives and the content in them. Some of the popular formats used for HD content include MKV, MP4, and the traditional AVI. The more the number of formats the player supports the less time you have to spend on converting them using a video converter. Also check to see if the player supports NTFS file partitions so you can connect external hard drives and flash drives without any issues.

Connect to the Internet

Most Blu-ray players present today can connect to the internet. Initially, this feature was brought in for a completely different feature called BD-Live. The feature allowed access to some additional content for the movie being watched, via the internet. This content could include anything such as bloopers, interviews and behind the scene segments. Internet-enabled Blu-ray players offer many more features today. Most Blu-ray players like smart TVs give you access to many audio-video services online such as YouTube, Netflix, Pandora and many more. You can also find 3D content on some of these services.  Some Blu-ray players also have an in-built browser to view websites. If you have a non-smart TV than these Blu-ray players are the ones you should opt for.

Wireless streaming

Wi-Fi connectivity on the Blu-ray player not only allows it to connect to the internet but also allows other devices on the network to stream media content to it, wirelessly. You can use your smartphones or tablets to stream files on the player, with the help of a router. Some high-end BD players also support Wi-Fi Direct, which allows you to stream content directly to the player, without the use of a router.

USB port to play media files

Most of us have store our content on external hard drives or pen drives. It’s very convenient to be able play movies off these drives on a Blu-ray player. Make sure that the Blu-ray player you’re looking to purchase supports hard drives formatted in NTFS partitions. Some Blu-ray players may also come with USB 3.0 support, which means smoother and quicker playback if your drive supports USB 3.0.

Easy to use remote

Every added feature on a Blu-ray player means more complicated menus and buttons on the remote. The buttons can make operating the player confusing at times. To keep things simple for everyone using the player, look for a Blu-ray player that offers all those features yet has a remote with few buttons on it. Some manufacturers have created mobile apps that let you use your phone as remote controls for the Blu-ray players. They can sometimes be easier and more interactive than the stock remote controls that come with the player.

 

 

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the external blu ray drive by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

Final Word

First of all thanks for reading my article to the end! I hope you find my reviews listed here useful and that it allows you to make a proper comparison of what is best to fit your needs and budget. Don’t be afraid to try more than one product if your first pick doesn’t do the trick.

Most important, have fun and choose your external blu ray drive wisely! Good luck!

So, TOP3 of external blu ray drive

 

 

Questions? Leave a comment below!

Chatting about external blu ray drive is my passion! Leave me a question in the comments, I answer each and every one and would love to get to know you better!



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